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the inside story from one of the leaders of that hunt, boston police commissioner ed davis. last monday afternoon, davis was in the stands at the finish line. all was going well, so he left to take a call. one of the city's favorite celebrations was coming to an end. the marathon is alwayse on th day that marks the start of the american revolution, but suddenly ed davis and a task force of more than 4,000 would find themselves defending boston on patriot's day. ( explosion ) when you arrived, what did you see? >> davis: i saw a bombing incident that i'd only seen in places overseas. i saw officer michael barrett from the boston police department wade into an unbelievable scene of carnage and put the fire out on an individual that was still on fire, and then grab belts off people and put tourniquets on the man's legs so he could save his life. >> pelley: this is your city. you're enormously proud of it. and these people had done this on patriot's day. >> davis: itertainly made me resolve to find these people quickly and to hold them accountable. >> pelley: you were going to get them. >>
have a couple of his best interviews that happened of late. clive davis for one is a legend in the music business but hs interview with imus is different than the others. the book called the sound track of my life went through his career. fasingnati even for those not crazy about the music business. for those that are, it will be one of the best interviews. mike breann to used to do sports on the "imus in the morning" program when he was announcer for the knicks and voice for espn. for those that know him for that, you don't know how funny he is but you will. mike breen has a new book called killing imus. we'll leave it there and he'll fill in the blanks. we were crying. we were laughing so hard and you will be as well. we'll have our humorous moments from the crew, including mississippi white boy. and to sing the blues for us and reverend jesse jackson. we begin with the record producer and music geat, clive davis. >> i was telling clive davis this was the first time in 40 years i've gotten a guest on five minutes earlier than scheduled time but clive davis, of course, is n
professor stack, who is troy davis? >>guest: i hope he will become a milestone in the march to the demise. i had a chance to talk to him and met family members and i think he was truly a strong person. i would call him a bill like figure who was at peace with himself and who i believe was innocent and wrongfully executed and i dedicate the book to troy and his family who taught me about love and loyalty and family and courage. >>host: walks us through the case he is a teenager teenager, african-american in savannah georgia and a murder takes place. troy is in the wrong place at the wrong time but not the triggerman his trial hinged on nine eyewitness identification is seven of the doom recanted there is no saliva, and no blood for fingerprints or murder weapon. the people who identified him said at the time of the crime they were coerced to sign confessions and some could not read, a teen-ager's at the time, scared, cooperated with the police because they thought millhouse -- felt they had to and troy was nailed in a ton there is the crime people in fear, anxiety, pressure i
putting the fate of the confederacy. >> host: to jefferson davis ever won an election? just. >> guest: he was a senator. he was nominated as a moderate in february of 1861 in montgomery, alabama. i do not think he ever did get elected. one of the things that the american thing -- the confederate constitution was a replica of the u.s. constitution. but it was not. a number of crucial changes occurred. one of them was a one term executive. and i believe it was a five-year executive term. >> host: professor stephanie mccurry, was there a lot of political insight during the war in the south? >> just come otherwise. there were no formal political parties. one of the things it that is interesting about the confederacy as it became clear and the things didn't exactly materialize. theoretically everyone was a democrat. there was no republican party or the republican party ticket. you could not vote for lincoln. they were allies with the democratic party. during the war, opposition arose and some of them were calmly profoundly opposed to days administration on very good grounds that the administra
off of the south fate with the confederacy. >>host: did jefferson davis actually when an election? >> he was a senator. he was nominated in a constitutional convention of the moderates of montgomery february 1861. i don't think he did actually. people think the emetic -- emitter -- american constitution was a replica but it wasn't. they innate made a number of crucial changes and one was the one-term executive of five years so he avoided reelection. >>host: professor stephanie mccurry was there lot of political infighting during the war in the south? >> there was. and no formal political parties. what is interesting about the confederacy is a lot of things were planned but never materialized. the political opposition in a clique form but everybody was a democrat. there was not a republican party ticket you could not vote for him and maybe in the deep south you could go for lincoln but they were all watching aunt and some of those were profoundly opposed to the davis a administration on good grounds that the davis administration was one of the most centralizing federal a concentrat
wrongful executions" professor stack who is troy davis? >> i hope he will become a milestone in the march toward the demise of the death penalty. i had a chance to talk with him and that many family members and i think he was truly a strong person i would call him like a buddha figure a man at peace with himself and who i believe was innocent and wrongfully executed and i dedicate the book to troy and his family to teach me about a fan courage. >>host: walk us through the case. >> 1989 troy is a teenager in savannah georgia and african-american and the murder takes place and the victim is not only the white but the off-duty police officer so you have that melodrama and he is in the wrong place at the wrong time but not the triggerman with all the evidence i can put together. his trial hinged online eyewitness identification seven of them recanted over his 20 years in prison. no saliva, and no blood or anything for dna dna, fingerprints or murder weapon. people who identified him said at the time of the crime they were investigating, they were coerced to sign confessions confessions, a cou
're telling the world we suck. bob, i know you like angela davis. imagine if a republican had a hard-core contingent of violent right wing radicals would hollywood celebrated that? >> bob: can you imagine if this was a republican. >> greg: it's true. >> bob: the thing with angela davis, she never was arrested or convicted of anything. the shotgun was taken out of her house. >> greg: which she purchased. >> gregg:. >> bob:, no she did not purchase. >> greg: yes, she did. >> bob: she is a communist why everybody hates her. >> greg: i hated her because he is a criminal. >> bob: she never was convicted of any crime. >> greg: i think a juror became a lover and supporter. she bought the arms that were used. >> bob: let me ask you this. in this country, if we are found not guilty, is there some reason we can't pursue life normally like everybody else? >> greg: that is good question. i think it's disgusting that academics embrace these people. these are horrible beam, bodean who shouldn't be in colombia, she should be in a jail. >> andrea: she spent 22 years in prison for armed car robbery a
davis. cathy davis. karen tateum. bradley whitmire. >> excuse me. honorary mayor, and supervisor, my name is victor boston. and really i need someone with a paper and pen. i have been looking for housing over i say nine months now. and i am about ready to lose my section 8. okay. i have letters here saying congratulations. we have placed on our waiting list. but we check our waiting list once a year. this is the second time. i have another application here, these are housing, this is the second list and there is five sheets. this is the second sheet and i have been in all of these places looking for housing. as i said again, my name is victor boston, and if you can give me insight, my number is 410-5756, and i am in desperate need of housing. i am a veteran, vietnam veteran at that. okay, i served my country. unfortunately i can't walk. but i am looking for some housing. please, thank you, mayor, thank you housing authority. thank you. >> mary harris. cathy davis. >> mary harris, president of my neighbors in action. on february 2 we had a lunar new year celebration at the rec center.
the remarkable life and times of angela davis. it's wednesday night, we're just getting started, you're in "the war room," and we'll be right back. party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know that i'm going to be the first one to call them out. they can question whether i'm right, but i think that the audience gets that this guy, to the best of his ability, is trying to look out for us. >> if you believe in state's rights but still support the drug war you must be high. >> "viewpoint" digs deep into the issues of the day. >> do you think that there is any chance we'll see this president even say the words "carbon tax"? >> with an open mind... >> has the time finally come for real immigration reform? >> ...and a distinctly satirical point of view. >> but you mentioned "great leadership" so i want to talk about donald rumsfeld. >> (laughter). >> watch the show. >> only on current tv. sglefrjts the united states senate let down an awful lot of people including the newtown families. i don't know how anybody who looked into the eye, could have voted the way they did today. >
in washington d.c. with author paul kengor of "the communist." who was frank marshall davis? >> frank marshall davis was born in kansas 1905, died and made you and 87. ended up in chicago and ultimately honolulu and that's where he would meet a young man named barack obama in the 70s. he was introduced by obama's grandfather, stanley dunham. i should back up a little bit. he was african-american. he was a republican from the time of lincoln to fdr. remarkably what so far to the left that during world war ii he joined the communist party. he joined communist party u.s.a. a lot of american communists never joined communist party u.s.a. you literally sworn allegiance to the soviet union, and you committed yourself to a communist party u.s.a. caught a soviet american republic. so davis really went to the other side and after that ended up editing -- he was the founding editor-in-chief of the communist party publication of chicago, the chicago star was a down the line pro-soviet pro-stalin publication. did that for two years and then went off to honolulu was a columnist for the record, basically th
were deported and i'm now going to graduate from u.c. davis next year, but i won't see my parents during my graduation. >> elena, tough story for steve, you're actually on the website and on the website you say you're a conservative republican. when you sort of put that part of you together with the part of being undocumented, how do the politics mix in here? what comes bubbling to the top? >> you know, i get a lot of questions about how is this even possible that you can be a dreamer and a republican. it's easy, i was raised a conservative republican, i was raised in texas all my life as a christian and i think there's certain values in this bill that are long due. i think it's very important to, like i said, as a nation of christians to show our christian side and to be human. >> does this leave you very confused, if you will, elena, about the political discussion that we have been watching so carefully in washington, d.c. and what you may want from it? >> no, i'm not at all confused. i think maybe people think that about me, but i know exactly what my morals are. i was -- i --
for the long "long view" that they perform. this night, he pulled 11-year-old davis. you see him whisper to davis a bit. i think he's asking him if you know the lyrics, sing in my ear. he hands him the mike and davis rocks the house. ♪ starting wailing in his youthful voice. ♪ billy joe is, like, yeah, kid. then he just rips into it. the best thing is this kid wasn't even alive when this song came out. >> right. >> he's not cower down either. he's owning that stage, owning that song. >> this confidence is not a one-time thing. he sang at a yankees game, at clippers games. he does have a rock band with his sister calls davisson. watch the conclusion of this moment, billy joe so grateful for the performance davis puts on, he makes him a trade, give me back my microphone, i'll give you a guitar. >> no way! >>> the very rare albino raccoon. see what it eats. >> no wonder, man. they're delicious. >> rare and caught on camera next "right this minute." >>> from sunday street ball wa rs re, and on this day there will be commentary. see if they scored with the players. >> they're like what is
the chatter. i showed the police officer it's somewhere. this is you're talking about raymond davis. here's a picture of raymond davis. you tell his story. who is raymond davis and what is the story that makes him the subject at the beginning of your book? >> raymond davis was a c.i.a. contractor who, former special forces officer. and he was in pakistan in lahore in early 2011, and part of a team that was doing some work on a pakistani militant grougroup. he ends up chooting two people on the street after they approach his car. with guns drawn. and what happened afterwards is this incredible story of a third person being killed after an american car tried to rescue davis, kills a third pakistani. davis ends up in jail. and there's this hole behind-the-scenes negotiation between the united states and pakistan to get him out of jail. when i went to pakistan last year what was pretty incredible to me was that, you know, the bin laden raid is what we talk about here in the united states. and the davis episode was so overshadowed by the bin laden raid here. on the streets in pakistan people t
... keepingbocce and we are all doing a great joba's astros orioles davis makes history a's are up 1-0.5th inning in houston. horace oriole player makes history 3 orioles honored for gold gloves.jj hardy, adam jones and matt wieters chris davis.grand slam to davis: joins willie mays, mark mcgwire and nelson cruz as only the 4th player to hit a home run in each of his first four games davis: ml record 16 rbi in first four games orioles win 9-5 49ers anthony davis $37 mil ghe 49ers have money to spend. davis joins mark mcgwire and neslon cruz.. anthony davis of the 49ers the former first-round t draft pick. or $37 million. he is just a big boy up front. started all 53 games and as we said he is a first round pick and today he gets paid like one with $70 million, guaranteed. when we come back, the rutgerts. and $17 minllion... for [ teen ] times are good, aren't they, kids? it's nice having u-verse, isn't it? see back in my day, we didn't have these newfangled wireless receivers. fangled? no, we watched march madness in the living room... that's where the tv outlet was. what is he talking about? and
edwin m. lee (applause) . . >> thank you very much mr. davis for that introduction, happy valentine's everybody ... >>> (applause) . >> wow what a wonderful occasion. i mean how can you be today valentine's day in a room full of heros on the field of heros yeah (applause) in the innovation capital of the world the world class city of san francisco congratulations everybody for being a hero today. you know the san francisco hospital foundation the general hospital foundation has been such a wonderful wonderful entity and i want to just thank stephanie your leadership, i want to thank julie and rich at the board with all of the other board members, the staff at the hospital, all of the staph, you know sometimes the doctors have to do it's emergency work but what makes that whole hospital run is literally everybody that works at the hospital from the social workers to the accountants to the administrators to the nurses, and nurse practitioner and is the doctors and all of the fundraisers thank you everybody for working together. and for today, again, a big thanks to ellen and pam
colin davis has died at the age of 85. >> davis was internationally renowned for his interpretations of mozart, site alias -- stability is -- mozart and sibelius. >> sir colin davis as guest conductor, playing sibelius, one of his favorite composers, with some of the most talented musicians in europe. >> they like to learn the pieces which they have not played before. it is exciting to play really great music. >> he once said, "music is our most beautiful invention." it was also one of the driving forces of his own life. he played with almost all the world's greatest orchestras. in 1980 three, he became chief conductor of the bavarian radio symphony orchestra -- in 1983, he became chief conductor of the bavarian radio symphony orchestra and helped it achieve international acclaim. in 1995, he was appointed principal conductor of the london symphony orchestra. in 2009, queen elizabeth honored him with the medal of music, one of many awards he collected in the course of his career. he died on sunday at the age of 85 after a short illness. >> a brief reminder now of our top story. it is
inside their homes. my colleague linsey davis watched the whole search unfold from the streets of watertown. >> reporter: boston was unsiege today as authorities found and killed tamerlan assure 9087 and cup toured his 19-year-old brother as he hid in a boat in a watertown neighborhood. the frantic search for the suspected boston marathon bombers began thursday when the fbi released these grainy images. our first glimpse of the most wanted men in america. the fbi needed the public's help tracking down their lead suspects in the attack but they warned then that these men were armed and very dangerous. >> no one should attempt to apprehend them except law enforcement. do not take any action on your own. >> reporter: it was no exaggeration. late last night, authorities discovered mit police officer sean collier shot and killed by the suspects. at first, authorities didn't realize there was a connection to the bombing. but then authorities say the two men carjacked a mercedes suv in cambridge, briefly kidnapped the driver, and led police on a wild, violent chase through the streets
authority. thank you. >> mary harris. cathy davis. >> mary harris, president of my neighbors in action. on february 2 we had a lunar new year celebration at the rec center. when we got up there, my husband and i noticed there was just this very tense vibration and we found out that lawrence collins was shot and killed at the rec center. so we lost another youth in the omi. we have had youth shot in front of inner city youth, we have had them shot in front of the omi family resource center. we were devastated, he was going to be 20 years old. as i was going to get ready to speak tonight. i went in my office and these 3 x 5 cards fell out. and i picked then up and read them. and then i realized that seven years ago with a different mayor and a different supervisor, i have been saying the same words, talking about the omi and violence prevention. and i can't believe i am here again and talking about the same thing. i am asking mayor lee work with the omi to come up with a violence prevention plan. i want diana, i am happy that you made director of violence prevention. i am thankful for th
of chicago, great guy. in 1970, his brother entered a courthouse armed with a shotgun that davis had bought. that gun blew a judge's head off. whatever became of davis? surprise. rewarded a faculty job and salary far beyond a prison guard's widow. how funny is it that left wing academics mock those with gun, but somehow embrace armed radicals who want to destroy america? i guess once cool and the other isn't, which is why kay jada is hawking her flick called "free angela" and all political prisoners. how objective was she? here is jada's describing davis, quote, she never apologized for her politics or associations and she always looked fabulous doing it. so be fab and hollywood bends over. thankfully, jada stronglywh condemns bullying. yeah, the go to issue for celebrities who cannot truly condemn deadly behavior. i guess being called names is far worse than getting your head shot off. so hooray for hollywood where charlton g heston gets humiliat. it's how we speak to the world and telling the world that we suck. >>> bob, i know you like angela davis u about i want to pose this question. i
boston. and we want to go straight to abc's linsey davis. she is there on the scene to tell you exactly what she heard, exactly what she is hearing from tl police around her right now. linsey? >> reporter: diane, we started a timeline, say, eight minutes ago, that's when i heard over the loudspeaker, "stop, don't move." we weren't sure that was someone th we weren't sure if someone that didn't want them there, then, people started milling around, coming outside of the homes and then, about five minutes afterward we heard this automatic gunfire. dozens of gunshots fired. people on the streets started cheering. the armored vehicle started making their way back into the vehicles, people sying get them. you can see police officers walking down the street. several officers do have guns on their backs but certainly before vehicle goings down are the armored vehicles so people were standing outside with their guns drawn moving fast. >> stand by we're going to play the sound of the gunshots as you heard them. everybody stand by, listen. so again they found distant to us. they sound unthreatenin
upside down i'm talking about the recall of california governor gray davis. davis a democrat was dogged by a saggy economy, energy blackouts, and frustration from his labor union base. fewer than 900,000 signatures were needed to launch the recall. it took only 65 signatures and $3,500 to get on the ballot. aside from the two candidates a cast of more than 100 characters ended up on the ballot from the famous arnold schwarzenegger arianna huffington, and larry flynt, to the onabsurd. a primary system that now rewards the top two vote getters regardless of party, and taking responsibility for drawing district boundaries away from lawmakers and giving it to state -- senator's panel. joining me now is joe garofoli. welcome back into "the war room." >> i object to calling gary coleman absurd. >> michael: yeah you could have said what are you walking about? how did this turn into this major recall. >> there was a very low turnout for the previous election very nasty where gray davis was up for reelection so the bar was low to have a recall. you had the energy crisis people
you have clyde davis on the show, play the famous music he produced. he's going to be here to talk to us about what's ahead for the business of music, and until then, enjoy the greatest songs he's behind. more "money" straight ahead. ♪ for teaching us that you can't create the future... by clinging to the past. and with that: you're history. instead of looking behind... delta is looking beyond. 80 thousand of us investing billions... in everything from the best experiences below... to the finest comforts above. we're not simply saluting history... we're making it. ♪ melissa: all the rage now, the virtual currency on wild ride as trading volumes spiked. bitcoin traded at $134. it shot to a high of 626 dollars, and now down to $91. a lot of volatility. some call for regulation, but bitcoin was created to be open sourced, decentralized. the government steps in to regulate it, doesn't that dpe feet the purpose? joining me now is large roger, ceo of bitcopy store, online electronics retailer that only accepts bitcopy, can't be easy, and a professor of finance who does think regulati
have clyde davis on the show, play the famous music he produced. he's going to be here to talk to us about what's ahead for the business of music, and until then, enjoy the greatest songs he's behind. more "money" straight ahead. ♪ hoo-hoo. hoo-hoo...hoo-hoo. hoo-hoo hoo. sir... i'll get it together i promise... heeheehee. jimmy: ronny, how happy are folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico? ronny:i'd say happier than the pillsbury doughboy on his way to a baking convention. get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. ♪ melissa: all the rage now, the virtual currency on wild ride as trading volumes spiked. bitcoin traded at $134. it shot to a high of 626 dollars, and now down to $91. a lot of volatility. some call for regulation, but bitcoin was created to be open sourced, decentralized. the government steps in to regulate it, doesn't that dpe feet the purpose? joining me now is large roger, ceo of bitcopy store, online electronics retailer that only accepts bitcopy, can't be easy, and a professor of finance who does think regulation
joining us, we are expecting a press conference from boston police commissioner ed davis at 4:45 eastern, 1:45 pacific in response to the two bombs that occurred a few hours ago in the final mile of the boston marathon. we're told by boston police that two individuals have been killed in these blasts and at least 28 have been wounded. cnn can also confirm that the faa ahas placed a temporary flight restriction over the site of the explosion in boston at the request of law enforcement. it has a radius of three nautical miles from the site and extends from the surface to 3,000 feet. i'm joined here in studio by jane harman, former congre congresswoman and chair ever the house intelligence committee. congress wox, we have been through a lot, certainly not as house intelligence chair or ranking member, ins departments like this. in fact, i believe this friday is the anniversary of both waco and the oklahoma city bombing. what's going through your mind as you watch these events unfold? >> well, i'm concerned. a signature of al qaeda, if this may be al qaeda -- and we have no proof yet or some
blast yesterday. his mother and younger sister were hurt too. abc's linsey davis traveled to their hometown. >> reporter: the big, brown smiling eyes of martin richard make the sorrow of what happened monday afternoon all the more palpable. the 8-year-old was known as a little league star. >> he was the fastest kid, the tallest on his team. just a marvel to watch on the field. just a delightful young boy. >> reporter: friends say the family went to the boston marathon every year. but one of those twin explosions ended his short life, sending his mother to the hospital with a serious head injury. his younger sister lost a leg. neighbors in this close knit community are now grieving along with martin's father. >> i was outside with my dog. i saw him get out of the car. he was dressed in hospital scrubs and i said, oh, my god, bill, are you okay? and he didn't even answer me. >> reporter: an outpouring of support and prayers for this family. on this facebook page. in a statement bill richards said, we thank our family and friends, those we know and those we have never met, fo
-- and the naacp chair. this is two and a half hours. >> good morning, ladies and gentlemen. i'm reverend davis the coordinator for the national action network. thank you so much. thank you for being here this morning, especially all of you vf been -- who have been here this week. we have had a wonderful time this week and want to thank all of you who came from all over the country to be with us. now we're about to get started on our program, i would like to introduce our founder and president of the national action network, the reverend al sharpton. [applause] >> good morning. ood morning. good morning and thank you. movement, measure the 2013. we are live on 1190 wliv, c-span, and it will run on c-span again during the week, three times, and msnbc. every year at the end of our national convention, we have the leaders of various national civil rights groups join us to talk about what they have done and we have done in the preceding year, what we have not been table
davis, the police commissioner put it, an ongoing event, adam. adam: an ongoing event and investigation. as we've been talking with the device that was found at jfk library, when you talk about these different devices multiple devices and question being might there be others out there, no official word of whether there are suspects as of yet. we know that the white house has been briefed that an aide from homeland security briefed president obama at 3:00 p.m. this afternoon, shortly after the first two explosions. we also know that the mayor of boston was not at the marathon at the time that this took place. and we're still awaiting for a press conference that he is going to have to brief us on the casualty count, the number of people injured, the severity of injuries and of course the number of people who have tragically been killed in this. liz: the 117th running of the boston marathon has been canceled right in the middle of it, okay? right in the middle of this most well-known marathon, in the world. two explosions went off. and multiple injuries. severe injuries, whoever did this,
with the author of the communist. who was frank marshall davis? >> he was born in kansas 1905 died 1987 and ended up in chicago ultimately honolulu where he would meet a young man named rocco bomb in the 1970's. he was introduced by his grandfather stanley dunham and i should back up a little bit, ed davis was african-american come early in his life he was a republican as a lot of black americans were from lincoln through fdr and then became part of the of progressive left that is a long complicated story in the book then went so far to the left during world war ii he joined the communist party usa. that is a big deal because there were a lot of american communists who never joined communist party usa when you do that you literally swore in allegiance to the soviet union, the stalinist soviet union and you committed yourself to what communist party usa that was the soviet american republic. so davis really went to the other side. after that he ended up and was the founding editor in chief of the communist party publication in chicago that was the down the line pro kremlin publication into that ye
, the commissioner of police davis. whether there's a sense this is being handled in an efficient, effective and calm manner so far. >> i think that first of all, i think both governor patrick and commissioner davis did themselves a great service last night at that press conference that took place while your show was on the air. governor patrick slapping down that alex jones idiot, then commissioner davis producing really the only piece of information at that press conference, which is that the gentleman in the hospital was not a suspect. and commissioner davis was quite firm about that. and i think they both did themselves a great service and the city a great service by being as definitive in pfotenhauer cases as they are. this is so far been a very locked down investigation. very little leaking. there's talk now about finding photographs before the event and whether or not the security along boylston street was at tight as it should be. >> charlie, i want to just jump in for a second so the viewers can see on the left is live images of the candle light vigil being held in dor chester moments ago, n
of the toughest. no one knows more about pushing through the tough times than laney davis. he'll join us after the break. i think the number one thing that viewers like about the young turks is that we're honest. they can question whether i'm right, but i think that the audience gets that this guy, to the best of his ability, is trying to look out for us. barack obama when the sox, celtics, operators patriots are winning again, the crowd will gather and watch the parade. and this time next year on the third monday on april the world will return to this great american city to run harder than ever and to cheer even louder for the 118th boston marathon. bet on it. >> michael: our president rallying spirits at the memorial for botch bombing victims earlier today. it was a speech that definitely wasn't on the white house agenda on monday. just four days ago the top of the agenda was getting stronger gun background checks in the senate and pushing ahead on the immigration reform. now only terror and political defeat are in the headlines. joining me from francisco to tell how the white house can get
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 755 (some duplicates have been removed)